Tag Archives: research

Yikes, I’ve won the Libertà Award : Guest Blog by Kate Hardy

  1. The Writer’s Dog : Guest Blog by Anne Gracie
  2. Finding Your Hero: Guest Blog by Louise Allen
  3. The Reader Writer Connection: Guest Blog by Sue Moorcroft
  4. The Amateur Sleuth: Guest Blog by Lesley Cookman
  5. Confessions of a Country House Tour Guide: Guest Blog by Nicola Cornick
  6. Romantic Series: Guest Blog by Sarah Mallory
  7. Jane Austen: Emotion in the Shrubbery
  8. Do you speak Oz? Guest Post by Janet Gover
  9. YA Heroes: Deliciously Bad? Guest Post by Pia Fenton
  10. Romantic Comedy — Guest Post by Alison May
  11. New Heyer Stories? Guest Post by Jennifer Kloester
  12. Handcuffed? Research? Guest Post by Patricia McLinn
  13. Fantasy research: sweat the small vampires? Kate Johnson guests
  14. Katie Fforde & Research: Guest Blog
  15. Sugar tongs at dawn? Elizabeth Rolls guests
  16. Gritty Saga Research: Jean Fullerton guests
  17. Elizabethan York without Dung? Pamela Hartshorne guests
  18. Love among the Thrillers: Alison Morton guests
  19. My Hairy-Chested Hero : Guest Blog by Christina Hollis
  20. Veronica the crafty companion : Guest blog by Judy Astley
  21. Writer’s Pet? Sort of — Guest blog by Catherine Jones
  22. Puppy Love : Guest Blog by Jane Godman
  23. Am I surviving the writer’s survival kit?
  24. Jenni Fletcher guest blog : the writer in lockdown
  25. Before The Crown there was a love story
  26. Yikes, I’ve won the Libertà Award : Guest Blog by Kate Hardy

As a follow-up to last weekend’s blog on the virtual ceremony for the RNA Awards 2021, this week we’re delighted to be able to welcome Kate Hardy, the winner of the LIbertà Books Shorter Romantic Novel Award 2021 for A Will, A Wish and A Wedding.

Kate is an old mate of the Libertà hive. She was one of the very kind authors who welcomed the then unpublished newbie, Joanna Maitland, to her very first RNA meeting. That was well over 20 years ago and Kate says she doesn’t remember. But Joanna does and is still grateful.

Kate Hardy's spaniels, Archie and DexterKate comes—be warned—with hairy hangers-on. So this is partly a writer’s pet blog too. It’s about time we did another of those, don’t you think?

Kate’s hangers-on, Archie (the big one) and Dexter, rejoice in the title of Edit-paw-ial Assistants.
More from them later.

Keep reading, as Kate tells us about how she became a published author and how she came to write the lovely butterfly-filled book that won our award.

Kate Hardy writes…

I’m thrilled to be here, as the winner of the 2021 Libertà Books Shorter Romantic Novel Award. It’s a glorious collision of numbers: for my 90th M&B, in my 20th year of being a M&B author and my 25th year of being a member of the RNA. And it’s also the third time I’ve won the award. As the photo below shows, I really wasn’t expecting it — and I’m so delighted!

Kate Hardy is announced as the winner of the Libertà Books Award 2021

Continue reading

The questions people ask writers… Research in Paris

So, do you do a lot of research?

Apart from, “Where do you get your ideas from?” that has to be the question writers are most asked.

And the answer is, for me, yes, actually.

Quite a lot.

Pinterest, Google, Youtube

Even before I put finger to keyboard I scour Pinterest, seeking ideas for locations, looking for photographs of places and characters as I build my storyboard. This is the one I’ve created for A Harrington Christmas (it’s a working title!)

Mostly, after that, it will be diving into Google as questions crop up? What is the temperature in Nantucket in March? What is the time difference between Paris and Singapore? Is there already a restaurant in London called any of the half a dozen names I’ve come up with — and yes to every one. Continue reading

Oh look! It’s Christmas… Time to panic?

No! Don’t panic!

Covers ears at the deafening groans.

There are a couple of months to go before we need to start to panic, but the groans are undoubtedly justified.

The children have only just gone back to school, the supermarket aisles are full of the momentary distraction of fake pumpkins and Halloween costumes, but they are already piling up the Christmas chocolate. (I took these two photographs just this morning.) And greetings cards are on sale for those organised enough to get them written before they get swept up in the season.

But forget the stress…

Continue reading

Cakes, Crooks and Fallen Women. Controlling Characters?

So. It is Almost Out (just like one of Heyer’s hopeful young ladies of the Regency). The Highborn Housekeeper. My book about a noblewoman turned cook. A kind of Regency Nigella.
And funnily enough, my heroine resembles her, too. In my head.

Picture by Brian Minkoff-London Pixels

Controlling Fallen Women?The Ton's Most Notorious Rake by Sarah Mallory

A few years ago I wrote about the fallen women of Compton Parva. (That was my working title. It was published by Harlequin/Mills & Boon as The Ton’s Most Notorious Rake.)

One of the “fallen women” was Nancy, the big-hearted, big-bosomed earl’s daughter who was the mother hen of the group, looking after everyone.

Controlling Nancy? She was far too large a personality to be confined to a bit part in one book.
I fought it, I truly did, but no. She would NOT lie down. Continue reading

Perfecting the Practice of Procrastination

Procrastination? Oh look, there’s a squirrel!

a cute squirrel is an excuse for procrastination

Hi, Sarah here. If you think writing is easy, think again!

Yes, an author might have a burst of creativity, ideas may come thick and fast, but translating those scenes in one’s head into a publishable book can be tortuous. Sometimes anything seems a better option than actually putting words on the page.

Recently, Liz Fielding and I sat down to discuss the problem of procrastination. Then we were distracted!

So — yesterday we finally sat down to discuss it!

Procrastination is the thief of time

Liz:  Ah, the P word, Sarah. What can I say?  When the words are slow to come, there is always the lure of Pinterest… Continue reading

Characters In the Shadows

Characters in Shadow - people at airport, in silhouette

As a story-teller, my process begins with a character. It is then my job to bring them out into the light of day.

Sometimes I know him or her well.

Sometimes I’ve just eavesdropped on a conversation or a thought. The whole person is still deep in shadows, waiting to reveal who he really is.Characters in the Shadows + napoleon

Stage Two is when I start to think about the What Ifs.

Sometimes this will be background and setting stuff –  like what if my hero stumbles across Napoleon? Or the Hadron collider? Or an international conspiracy?

But usually it’s more personal. Characters in novels are awkward sods.

What if my character insists on making a different choice from what I expect? Continue reading

Reader, I married them (while researching the rake)

statue of a rake?As anyone researching the Regency period knows, the rake — the real Regency rake — was dangerous, unscrupulous and sometimes even a vicious womaniser.

I am very sorry, dear reader, if I have shattered your illusions.

Many of us like the fantasy of “taming” a bad boy, but most of us know in our hearts that it is nigh on impossible. Not quite impossible, of course. There are exceptions to the rule, but these are probably as rare in real life as the number of real live dukes in existence (which may be material for another story, another time).

silhouette of man's head in question markquestion mark being broken by handThere is always something to research for a new book. Often it seems obvious — military history for instance, when one sets a book around the Battle of Waterloo; or costume details for the period.

We have to invent a history for each of our characters. It may not feature in the actual book, but it is very necessary. As my latest book has proved. Continue reading

Discoverability and Reviews, from the Reader’s POV

reviews reading with catReaders don’t talk much about discoverability or even reviews, I find. Writers, of course, worry about them all the time.

I’m both. But I read more books than I write.

Heck, I read more words than I write and I’ve been motoring at 3,000 words a day for a while now. That’s gross, you understand. In every sense of the word, probably, though I’d prefer you to interpret it as the opposite of net.

Reviews and Recommendations

As a reader, I like recommendations. Not reviews so much. Well not big ticket reviews in the Grown Up media, anyway. I slightly mistrust them. There’s always the feeling that the reviewer is writing with one eye on the book and the other on his own credibility with fellow critics. Continue reading

A Sideways Look at Regency Life — All At Sea!

figure contemplating slightly stormy sea

When we read fiction set in the Regency period, we often come across references to sea journeys but, usually, they’re over pretty quickly. On one page, we’re at Dover or Harwich or Falmouth. A paragraph or two later, we’ve arrived at our destination and the story continues. (Not in all fiction, of course. Who could forget Mary Challoner’s horrendous cross-Channel trip in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub? Still, at least Vidal proffered a basin at the vital moment.)

Nowadays, our ships have GPS and radar and even engines! 😉 So this modern figure, staring out over a slightly stormy sea, has little to fear from going on board. But what was it really like, making a sea voyage on one of the Regency’s relatively tiny and fragile sailing craft?

Let’s take an imaginary sea journey…

Continue reading

Elizabethan York without Dung? Pamela Hartshorne guests

  1. The Writer’s Dog : Guest Blog by Anne Gracie
  2. Finding Your Hero: Guest Blog by Louise Allen
  3. The Reader Writer Connection: Guest Blog by Sue Moorcroft
  4. The Amateur Sleuth: Guest Blog by Lesley Cookman
  5. Confessions of a Country House Tour Guide: Guest Blog by Nicola Cornick
  6. Romantic Series: Guest Blog by Sarah Mallory
  7. Jane Austen: Emotion in the Shrubbery
  8. Do you speak Oz? Guest Post by Janet Gover
  9. YA Heroes: Deliciously Bad? Guest Post by Pia Fenton
  10. Romantic Comedy — Guest Post by Alison May
  11. New Heyer Stories? Guest Post by Jennifer Kloester
  12. Handcuffed? Research? Guest Post by Patricia McLinn
  13. Fantasy research: sweat the small vampires? Kate Johnson guests
  14. Katie Fforde & Research: Guest Blog
  15. Sugar tongs at dawn? Elizabeth Rolls guests
  16. Gritty Saga Research: Jean Fullerton guests
  17. Elizabethan York without Dung? Pamela Hartshorne guests
  18. Love among the Thrillers: Alison Morton guests
  19. My Hairy-Chested Hero : Guest Blog by Christina Hollis
  20. Veronica the crafty companion : Guest blog by Judy Astley
  21. Writer’s Pet? Sort of — Guest blog by Catherine Jones
  22. Puppy Love : Guest Blog by Jane Godman
  23. Am I surviving the writer’s survival kit?
  24. Jenni Fletcher guest blog : the writer in lockdown
  25. Before The Crown there was a love story
  26. Yikes, I’ve won the Libertà Award : Guest Blog by Kate Hardy

Sadly, today is the last of our series on research. But we’re finishing with a bang!
In delectable medieval York.

author-pamela-hartshorne-specialist-in-york

Today, we welcome Pamela Hartshorne, a York specialist. Her credentials are beyond doubt — she has a PhD in medieval studies — but she manages to wear her research very lightly. She has written dozens of books for Mills & Boon, a publisher that definitely doesn’t want dry background material to get in the way of the love story between hero and heroine.

Every time someone asked whether she’d use her research in a book, her answer was always no.
Until, one day …

One day, no finally became yes. Pamela turned to writing historical novels set in her beloved York, where she’d done her academic research. Was she taking a risk? Could she make the jump from Mills & Boon romance  to mainstream timeslip? Here’s her story . . .

Research may be useful … or not

tudor-york-map

John Speed’s late 16th century map of York

 

By the time I sat down to write a historical novel, I was feeling pretty confident. I’d already written over 50 books for Mills & Boon, so I figured I knew something about storytelling. Continue reading